Anzac Coves

"In the evening I attended a Pierrot show which was most enjoyable, all the artists were professional, it was a treat to hear some music."
Stretcher-bearer Langford Colley-Priest 

“The Anzac Coves
Dispensers of joy and jollity
Fun and frivolity”

They were a respite from mud, fear and death. The Anzac Coves entertainment troupe performed with a lively sense of humour which satirised military life and the soldiers loved it. They set up their theatres in barns and sheds, just back from the trenches and their shows were always packed. They were so popular they toured Britain during 1918 and even performed at Buckingham Palace in front of the King, Queen and Princess Mary. 

‘Straight from the firing line’

All of the Coves had seen active service as soldiers. Some had been at Gallipoli, others at the Western Front. There were singers, comedians, female impersonators, a monologist who was James Brunton Gibb (who recited poems and monologues, singers, dancers and musicians. There was also burlesque.

Pierrots

They were a Pierrot troupe, a part of the musical hall tradition. Pierrots were originally a French entertainment that had spread across the channel to Britain. Pierrots would sing, dance, juggle and make jokes at seaside venues in Britain up until the 1950s. 

The Coves had 23 performers and an orchestra and performed for over 250,000 soldiers, writing much of their own material including their 1917 Christmas pantomime, Dick Whittington and his cat. They rehearsed their pantomime in the Ypres area with shells and bombs falling nearby.

The painted scenery and props were all built by the Coves themselves. The theatres they played in were usually large barns or sheds converted into a theatre with a stage, a cinema and electric lights, all carried and installed by the Coves.

Featured
Street signs, the corner of Frederick St and Dodson Av
Trove solves a family mystery

All the WW1 records for my great grand uncle showed he lived in Hanover St, Lidcombe. However, this street no longer exists. Searching in Trove I discovered the street had been renamed to honour another soldier, Private Frederick Doodson who was killed on Anzac Day landing at the Dardanelles. The digitised newspapers helped me to unravel a mystery in the family history. Trove supplied the missing piece to the puzzle and also the reason why the street name was changed, and the wonderful recognition for the local soldier who died.

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